Feb 052018
 

madmackerel – February 5, 2018 at 03:17PM
Tags:singles,_AMERICANA

Roaming Herds of Buffalo are an indie rock band from Seattle. They have just released an album called The Bugbears via Bandcamp (which you can order here).

Listen to the appropriately titled Winter Sun which has a lot going from it, from the plaintive lyrical opening to the satisfyingly muscular guitars at the end.

Have a listen.

 

Follow @madmackerel

Feed: http://ift.tt/2ciMFQk
Inoreader Page: http://ift.tt/2BY2HsM
Blog post: http://ift.tt/2nESdu2

Feb 052018
 

Karen Miller – February 5, 2018 at 02:13PM
Tags:Podcasts,_AMERICANA

  • Cherryholmes: Brand New Heartache (Cherryholmes,Skaggs Family Records)
  • Andrew Sheppard: Travel Light and Carry On (Steady Your Aim,promo)
  • Jeff Finlin: Somewhere South Of Wonder (Somewhere South of Wonder,Gravity)
  • Sam Baker: Button by Button (Say Grace,Music Road Records)
  • Blaze Foley: If I Could Only Fly (Wanted More Dead Than Alive,Waddell Hollow Records)
  • John Prine: Clay Pigeons (Fair & Square,Oh Boy)
  • Jonah Tolchin: Oval Room (Criminal Man,New Wheel)
  • Ruby Boots: Don’t Talk About It (Don’t Talk About It,Bloodshot Records)
  • Caleb Caudle: Stack of Tomorrows (Crushed Coins,Cornelius Chapel Records)
  • Ady Johnson: The Glass Tower (London Songs,self-released)
  • Chris Stapleton: Broken Halos (From A Room: Volume 1,Decca)
  • Jason Isbell: Chaos and Clothes (The Nashville Sound,Southeastern Records)
  • Robert Vincent: You Wouldn’t Let It (I’ll Make The Most of My Sins,At The Helm Records)
  • Courtney Marie Andrews: How Quickly Your Heart Mends (Honest Life,Mama Bird)
  • Emily Barker: Over My Shoulder (Sweet Kind of Blue,Everyone Sang)
  • Yola Carter: Home (Orphan Offering,Ear Trumpet Music)
  • Sam Outlaw: Tenderheart (Tenderheart,Six Shooter Records)
  • The Wandering Hearts: Wish I Could (Wish I Could (Single),Decca)
  • Jason Ringenberg: Last Of The Neon Cowboys (A Pocketful Of Soul,Courageous Chicken)
  • Chatham County Line: Lonesome in Caroline (Speed Of The Whippoorwill,Yep-Roc)
  • Yarn: Heaven In You (Lucky 13,self-released)
  • Colter Wall: Motorcycle (Colter Wall,Thirty Tigers)
  • Arlo Guthrie: The Motorcycle Song (Alice’s Restaurant,Warner Bros)
  • Tyler Childers: Honky Tonk Flame (Purgatory,Hickman Holler Records)
  • Tyler Stenson: Denim Sky (New Northbound,self-released)
  • Jesse Terry: Mr Blue Sky (feat. Liz Longley) (Natural,Jackson Beach Records)
  • True North: Seed, Leaf, Flower, Seed (Open Road Broken Heart,True North)
  • Ad Vanderveen: Ruminations (Denver Nevada,CRS)
  • Darrell Scott: Jesus Was A Capricorn (Live At The Station Inn,Full Light Records)
  • Grant Peeples: This Could Be A Long Night (Settling Scores Vol II,self-released)
  • Union Duke: A Brief Romance (Golden Days,self-released)


Feed: http://ift.tt/20sHRc9
Inoreader Page: http://ift.tt/2GST8PB
Blog post: http://ift.tt/2E3AHWC

Feb 052018
 

Karen Miller – February 5, 2018 at 01:48PM
Tags:Podcasts,_AMERICANA

  • Cherryholmes: Brand New Heartache (Cherryholmes,Skaggs Family Records)
  • Andrew Sheppard: Travel Light and Carry On (Steady Your Aim,promo)
  • Jeff Finlin: Somewhere South Of Wonder (Somewhere South of Wonder,Gravity)
  • Sam Baker: Button by Button (Say Grace,Music Road Records)
  • Blaze Foley: If I Could Only Fly (Wanted More Dead Than Alive,Waddell Hollow Records)
  • John Prine: Clay Pigeons (Fair & Square,Oh Boy)
  • Jonah Tolchin: Oval Room (Criminal Man,New Wheel)
  • Ruby Boots: Don’t Talk About It (Don’t Talk About It,Bloodshot Records)
  • Caleb Caudle: Stack of Tomorrows (Crushed Coins,Cornelius Chapel Records)
  • Ady Johnson: The Glass Tower (London Songs,self-released)
  • Chris Stapleton: Broken Halos (From A Room: Volume 1,Decca)
  • Jason Isbell: Chaos and Clothes (The Nashville Sound,Southeastern Records)
  • Robert Vincent: You Wouldn’t Let It (I’ll Make The Most of My Sins,At The Helm Records)
  • Courtney Marie Andrews: How Quickly Your Heart Mends (Honest Life,Mama Bird)
  • Emily Barker: Over My Shoulder (Sweet Kind of Blue,Everyone Sang)
  • Yola Carter: Home (Orphan Offering,Ear Trumpet Music)
  • Sam Outlaw: Tenderheart (Tenderheart,Six Shooter Records)
  • The Wandering Hearts: Wish I Could (Wish I Could (Single),Decca)
  • Jason Ringenberg: Last Of The Neon Cowboys (A Pocketful Of Soul,Courageous Chicken)
  • Chatham County Line: Lonesome in Caroline (Speed Of The Whippoorwill,Yep-Roc)
  • Yarn: Heaven In You (Lucky 13,self-released)
  • Colter Wall: Motorcycle (Colter Wall,Thirty Tigers)
  • Arlo Guthrie: The Motorcycle Song (Alice’s Restaurant,Warner Bros)
  • Tyler Childers: Honky Tonk Flame (Purgatory,Hickman Holler Records)
  • Tyler Stenson: Denim Sky (New Northbound,self-released)
  • Jesse Terry: Mr Blue Sky (feat. Liz Longley) (Natural,Jackson Beach Records)
  • True North: Seed, Leaf, Flower, Seed (Open Road Broken Heart,True North)
  • Ad Vanderveen: Ruminations (Denver Nevada,CRS)
  • Darrell Scott: Jesus Was A Capricorn (Live At The Station Inn,Full Light Records)
  • Grant Peeples: This Could Be A Long Night (Settling Scores Vol II,self-released)
  • Union Duke: A Brief Romance (Golden Days,self-released)


Feed: http://ift.tt/1LsBxtb
Inoreader Page: http://ift.tt/2EJHh5Z
Blog post: http://ift.tt/2E3AHWC

Feb 052018
 

Trigger – February 5, 2018 at 12:37PM
Tags:_AMERICANA,REVIEWS
So what happened? It’s less likely that Justin Timberlake and Timbaland were lying, and more likely that the country record Justin Timberlake envisioned never got made. At some point in the process, Timberlake must have had a change of heart. The entire pursuit was scrapped for what became “Man of the Woods.”

Feed: http://ift.tt/1fj1uBu
Inoreader Page: http://ift.tt/2E6JVkM
Blog post: http://ift.tt/2EJa3TY

Feb 052018
 

Green – February 5, 2018 at 12:08PM
Tags:_AMERICANA

61dNjVls%2BfL._SS500.jpg320 kbps | 102 MB | LINKS

The bloodless, broken relationship depicted in the forlorn and decidedly rustic “A Bed This Cold,” off bluegrass and gospel darling Kristy Cox’s new album Ricochet, is almost certainly a lost cause. Her partnership with Grammy-winning producer/songwriter Jerry Salley, on the other hand, has a brighter future.

Their past recordings have been showered with critical praise, and Cox and Salley have struck gold again with Ricochet, where contemporary production burnishes warm, traditional instrumentation and lives in wedded bliss with graceful harmonies and engaging country-pop songcraft. If the heat has gone out in “A Bed This Cold” —an affecting, unflinching dissection of eroded intimacy wrapped in thin, tattered acoustic folk and pained vocals that practically shiver—the deliriously sunny and upbeat “South to North Carolina” offers a fun summer road trip. A whirling dervish of countrified strings and irresistible escapism, it is just as lively and infectious as the jumping title track.

Dancing with Cox’s honeyed crooning throughout the rest of Ricochet, a meticulously woven mix of soft-textured dobro, fiddle, mandolin and banjo make the bittersweet incandescence of “Right Where You Left It” swoon and smoothly guide her carefree gait and empowered defiance in “Just Me Leaving.” Known for her hopeful, angelic sweetness, Cox sings with a growing maturity and beguiling sophistication on Ricochet that’s more in tune with worldly realities. Although the lighthearted “Blame It on God” and a more somber “I Still Pray” let everyone know that Cox still looks to the heavens for inspiration and strength.

—Peter Lindblad


Feed: http://ift.tt/1Rg5Y7R
Inoreader Page: http://ift.tt/2nNBmV4
Blog post: http://ift.tt/2E3k8hC

Feb 052018
 

driX – February 5, 2018 at 11:46AM
Tags:_AMERICANA

Year of the Rabbit Those born under the year of the rabbit are said to be elegant, gentle, quiet and melancholic. Such descriptions perfectly suit Allison Pierce, who is starting out as solo artist after a long career working with her sister in The Pierces. Year of the Rabbit is rich blend of folk, country and indie influences which fits well into the blossoming Americana genre and on the strength of the songs it feels like she has finally found her true musical home.

The Pierces always walked the line between polished pop and indie credibility, which at times left them adrift of both worlds. There was a glossy glamour to her previous music which is absent on this solo record – here Allison is rooted in the earth and this feeling is aided by Ethan Johns…

  103 MB  320 ** FLAC

…quietly lush production. Allison’s voice, allowed to stand front and centre for the first time, has a perfect tone for the style of the acoustic opening song Fool Him. This is the story of a complicated relationship where you don’t know who’s cheating on who – classic country in its themes as well as sound.

The video for Evidence has Allison walking down a street and through fields – looking happily free despite the devil who’s following her. There’s no malice in his presence – in fact she’s enjoying his company. The song is hugely catchy and you start to sing along instantly. Well the devil always had the best tunes, didn’t he?

Follow You Down is more folk influenced and can’t help sounding a little Celtic. On this song she sings of an unhealthy relationship where she has been happily seduced by someone, despite the hell that they may cause her.

Never Coming Back uses the upper reaches of her voice to beautiful effect. Here her lover has left her behind, without even a kiss goodbye. She’s looking back to this relationship fondly, despite being heartbroken. It’s fitting then that the next song Sea of Love is so joyful and celebratory. Despite her hardships and the distance between her and her beloved she still sings love is all we’ve got and all we’ll ever need.

Drink One For You again has her back heartbroken and now she’s in the bar drowning her sorrows. Where else can you go? Drinking for two, I’ll drink one for you. You can’t help but think she’s better off without this guy, even if she’s not brave enough to admit it yet. The theme may be old fashioned, but then again this is the reality of many women’s lives even if it’s quite far away from the feminist ideal.

To the Grave is very hippie 60s in its style, even if the lyrics feel a little macabre at first. Death will inevitably come. We’re all helpless to the song. Marching us all to our graves. She can’t escape this relationship, just like you can’t avoid death and taxes. There’s no doom in the sound, she’s happily entranced by this dark magic.

There’s a gospel feel to the a cappella It Is Well With My Soul, echoing some of the religious themes subtly woven in this album. The closing song Peace Like a River considers the importance of forgiveness, despite everything she only wishes the best for the wandering souls who have left her behind.

The rabbit in China is seen as a symbol of hope, and you feel this optimistic spirit throughout the music. Year of the Rabbit is an album of natural beauty which is definitely worth following.


Feed: http://ift.tt/1J5uJ7t
Inoreader Page: http://ift.tt/2s8XyOV
Blog post: http://ift.tt/2EJphIL

Feb 052018
 

Ken Bigger – February 5, 2018 at 09:53AM
Tags:_AMERICANA

Jason Isbell and Amanda Shires, (screen capture from performance on Jimmy Kimmel Live)

Jason Isbell and Amanda Shires, (screen capture from performance on Jimmy Kimmel Live)

This is the twelfth installment in our “Conversations with Death” sub-series.

Introduction

My spouse had cancer 14 years ago. She’s fully recovered. I’m still not sure I am. When I think back over the complex set of interests and experiences that drew me to create this blog, it’s hard to dismiss this particular brush with mortality from the group. The vulnerability introduced by this traumatic period took me from one kind of blissful ignorance into an unwelcome and surprisingly thorny awareness. I’m still untangling it.

The experience had, among other effects, the propensity to turn many later moments of solitary parenting into reminders that this is what my life would have been like if she hadn’t made it. Despite the many things to celebrate and be thankful for about her healing and recovery, part of my mind inevitably drifted to the “what ifs” and the disaster that felt all too narrowly averted. I probably had an over-cultivated sense of tragedy to begin with. This episode made it all the more difficult to dig out of it.

“If We Were Vampires”


My introduction to Jason Isbell‘s work was through radio play of “Hope the High Road” of The Nashville Sound. That track was the song of the year for one my favorite local DJs last year. After that, I stumbled across Isbell’s NPR Tiny Desk Concert, which included a well done suite of “Chaos and Clothes,” “Molotov,” and a pleasantly participatory “Last of My Kind.” Isbell’s lyrical facility grabs you by the collar.

Not long after I saw this clip, GQ published an “Epic Conversation” between Isbell and author George Saunders. Isbell discusses in that conversation how his writing sometimes overwhelms him. Following the song all the way through to where it needs to go can lead to some tough places. He explains that he couldn’t get through a first, private performance of “If We Were Vampires” without breaking down. I had to take a break from the GQ clip to hear why.

This is why:

Lyrics

Conversations and duets

“If We Were Vampires” just won a Grammy for Best American Roots Song for Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit. It is certainly now one of the less obscure songs we’ve explored here. As Isbell acknowledges in the Saunders interview, the title is misleading. What sounds like an imaginative flight of young adult fiction is a devastatingly serious reflection on love and death.

Isbell’s songs are generally pretty accessible to play–not a lot of fancy chords or convoluted lyrics. “The art lies in hiding the art,” says Horace. I’ve added a few Isbell songs to my regular “playing in” repertoire. When Isbell talked about not being able to get through it, I heard what he was saying. When I first attempted to sing it myself, I understood. I couldn’t get through it, either.

“If We Were Vampires” is, in our parlance, a “Conversation with Death.” It was a conversation that was too difficult for me to have. It was not only my death that the song contemplated and conversed with, but another’s death as well. I’m challenged to identify another song that unfolds that vulnerability of “wearing your heart outside your body” more effectively.

I still can’t imagine how Isbell and his wife, Amanda Shires, could get through this performance of the song on Jimmy Kimmel.

Continue to page 2>>>

The post One Day You’ll Be Gone: “If We Were Vampires” — CwD 12 appeared first on Sing Out!.


Feed: http://singout.org/feed
Inoreader Page: http://ift.tt/2GPczsI
Blog post: http://ift.tt/2s4QNxy

Feb 052018
 

desolationangel – February 4, 2018 at 09:45PM
Tags:_AMERICANA

Desolation Angel Radio hit the air on Sunday night and it sounded like this:

  • I Need Never Get Old – Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats
    Midnight Train to Memphis – Chris Stapleton & Sturgill Simpson
    Just My Imagination – The Rolling Stones
    I Just Want To Make Love To You – Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers
    Let It Rock – Bob Seger & The Silver Bullet Band
    The Open Road – Jimmy LaFave
    John The Revelator – Larkin Poe
    The Mother – Brandi Carlisle
    Baby Got Gone – Kenny Wayne Shepard
    Black Coffee – Beth Hart & Joe Bonamassa
    Halfway Home – Jon Langford & Four Lost Souls
    Pay Gap – Margo Price
    Lost in America – Edwin McCain
    The Perilous Night – Drive-By Truckers
    All Along The Watchtower – Neil Young & Patti Smith
    I’ve Got To Use My Imagination – Joan Osborne
    Everybody’s Coming To My House – David Byrne
    Find Yourself – Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real
    Tramp – Buddy Guy
    Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright – Susan Tedeschi
    Instant Karma – John Lennon & The Plastic Ono Band
    What Else Would You Have Me Be? – Lucero
    You Worry Me – Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats
    One Way Out – Larkin Poe
    Respect Commander – Jack White
    Edge of Darkness – Greta Van Fleet
    Free – Bonnie Bishop
    Right Place, Wrong Time – Dr. John
    Hard To Handle – Tony Joe White
    Don’t Do It – The Band
    Midnight In Harlem – Tedeschi Trucks Band

As always, thanks for being some of the best listeners, fans and audience in the world

 

Kip


Feed: http://ift.tt/1SPUOJs
Inoreader Page: http://ift.tt/2nCjz43
Blog post: http://ift.tt/2BWUvck

Feb 042018
 

Jeff – February 4, 2018 at 03:20PM
Tags:Podcasts,_AMERICANA

Episode #727 Today we play Namedropper, where each and every song is either about another song or songwriter, or mentions one or more of ’em! See if you can keep score at home and pick out all of the mentions, … Continue reading

The post Podcast: February 4, 2018 – Namedropper appeared first on Tell the Band to Go Home.


Feed: http://ift.tt/1NANkXY
Inoreader Page: http://ift.tt/2EFM7Rt
Blog post: http://ift.tt/2DZO1eD